User Manual Instructions

TSX-V | IFX 1.05 +0.00 +0% Volume: 12,500 Min 20 minute delay December 14, 2017
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Transportation and Storage

Product rolls not being used should always be stored in the original packaging, not come in contact with moisture, kept distant from direct light and heat sources and stored in a cold, dry place on a smooth surface.

To avoid physical damage that may impact the laying and performance in the field, rolls should be kept in a vertical position in order to avoid crushing and deformations caused by stacking. Rolls must be transported with care.

Accidental tears or deformations, due to incorrect storage or transportation may reduce the film performance in the field. Inspect film before use and remove any damaged parts of the film before installation.

Note: Compostable products require particular attention during transportation and storage.



Calculation of quantity of film needed

These agricultural film products have been produced to accepted standard industry yields based on 30,000 in2 per pound polyethylene at 1 mil.
All gauge calculations are based on these yields with a standard industry tolerance of +/- 5%. All representations are displayed as nominal values and are for reference only.

Formula to Calculate Roll Weight:
Roll Weight = (roll width x length x gauge x 12)/30,000

Note: Calculation of Quantity of Compostable Film Needed:

These products have been produced to accepted standard industry yields based on 30,000 in2 per pound polyethylene at 1 mil, which need to be adjusted for the higher density of the compostable plastic used to 20,000 in2 per pound at 1 mil.

All gauge calculations are based on these yields with a standard industry tolerance of +/- 5%. All representations are displayed as nominal values and are for reference only.

Formula to Calculate Roll Weight:
Roll Weight = (roll width x length x gauge x 12)/20,000



Installation

These films can be laid using conventional plastic mulch layer equipment; however tension needs to be adjusted properly to reduce the likelihood of tearing.

The film must be laid in continuous and tight contact with the soil and its edges secured with a generous amount of soil to avoid “whipping” in the wind. Whipping causes tearing of the film and abrasion on the stems of seedling transplanted leading to plant death.

Film should be laid without pockets or depressions and water to run‐off quickly. Water collected in depressions will reduce the lifespan of the film.

Note: Do not lay compostable mulch film within a day of bed top organic fertilization.



Planting Holes

Use sharp tools to make small seedling holes with well-maintained, clean edges to maximize ground coverage and reduce possible breakage of the film.

Note: Dull tools increase the likelihood of rupturing film punch holes and reduce film life. Seedlings should be transplanted immediately after drilling.



Use and Lifespan

Use and Lifespan of Non-Compostable Films:

The film integrity depends on the interaction of a range of physical and environmental factors present in the field. This includes, but is not limited to, installation quality, surrounding acidic and alkaline materials, film thickness, soil moisture, heat, light and agrochemicals use.

Experience shows that non-compostable film keeps its integrity for the length of one growing cycle of the crop to be transplanted, in general from 4 up to 9 months under regular conditions and gauges. Film thickness needs to be selected accordingly with the length of the growing cycle of the crop to be transplanted.

Crops grown on film can be treated with approved pest control, soil fumigants and nutritional products when used in accordance with those products’ labels; however, the type and quantity of those agrochemicals used can negatively affect performance and lifespan of the film.

Use and Lifespan of Compostable Films:

The film integrity depends on the interaction of a range of physical and environmental factors present in the field. This includes, but is not limited to, installation quality, surrounding acidic and alkaline materials, film thickness, soil moisture, heat, light, agrochemical use and microbial activity.

Composting commences when the film is laid, and degradation will become first visible at the interface with the soil at the edges, or around planting holes. Experience shows that film keeps its integrity on soil for a period ranging of 1 to 2 months at 0.5 mil, 2 to 4 months at 0.6 mil and 4 to 6 months at 0.8 mil thickness. Film thickness needs to be selected accordingly with the length of the growing cycle of the crop to be transplanted.

Crops grown on film can be treated with approved pest control, soil fumigants and nutritional products when used in accordance with those products’ labels; however, the type and quantity of supplemental products used can negatively affect performance and lifespan of the film.

Note: Strongly acid or alkaline pesticide formulations or adjuvants used in addition to film as well as certain heavy metals containing micronutrient fertilizers can damage non-compostable and compostable films and will reduce their lifespan. Select formulations that can be applied at a pH between 6.5 and 7.5.



After Harvest

Waste Management: Recycling, Disposal, Composting or Anaerobic Digestion

Recycling and Disposal:

At the end of the crop cycle residual films can be safely recycled or disposed in compliance with federal, state and county regulations.

Composting and Anerobic Digestion of Compostable Films:

Residual compostable films can be safely composted or cultivated into the soil together with the crop residues at the end of the crop cycle, depending on federal, state and county regulations.

The best result will be obtained using equipment that shreds the film into small pieces before composting or incorporation into the soil. This ensures fewer larger fragments, which are hard to digest for compost and soil microorganisms.

As a general rule, microbial digestion is the fastest under aerobic, warm, moist conditions and high microbial populations in compost. Anaerobic digestion in soil is a slower process and as a general rule takes at least as long as the lifespan of the used film gauge on soil.
Any compostable film left on the field surface will break down much more slowly.
However microbial digestion is a natural process and results can alter from site to site and year to year.

Note: The National Organic Program (NOP) final rule (United States Department of Agriculture [Usda], 2000) requires removal of all plastic mulches from the field at the end of the growing season in Organic Vegetable Production.



U.S. EPA Buffer Zone Reduction Credits

Certain of Imaflex’s barrier films qualify for buffer zone credits as determined by the U.S. Epa and California Department of Pesticide Regulation (Cdpr).
The amount of credit varies depending on the type of film.

Consult the U.S. Epa webpage www.epa.gov/soil-fumigants/tarps

and Cpdr webpage www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/emon/pubs/tac/dpr_tarp_list.pdf

to verify whether the fumigant resistant agricultural film qualifies for buffer zone reduction credit and to determine the specific amount of any credit which may be available.